04 August 2017
Music as Media of Interaction and Non-Verbal Expression
Monica Subiantoro, Coordinator of Music Therapy Concentration, Conservatory of Music UPH, said that music could become a medium of interaction between one person and another. By improvising some techniques, music can also help those who experience difficu
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Monica Subiantoro along with the students of Music Therapy UPH and Participants, Played Musical Instruments together to achieve a harmonization 

 

Monica Subiantoro, Coordinator of Music Therapy Concentration, Conservatory of Music UPH, said that music could become a medium of interaction between one person and another. By improvising some techniques, music can also help those who experience difficulties in communicating verbally. This was stated by Monica during UPH Public Exposure, which was held at Lippo Mall Puri, on July 28, 2017.

 

 Monica also added that naturally, the human has their own rhythm, beat, which will later be identified as a natural music coming from the body. Thus, music is able to adjust and be a natural medium that helps human’s physical and emotional condition.

 

In UPH Public Exposure, Monica wanted to engage the public to join her to play music instrument which she used for her therapy sessions.  Some of the participants who were not quite familiar with music instrument started by playing the musical instrument according to their own rhythm and liking, but slowly, they could get used to the rhythm and they naturally adjust to the harmony without having any practice beforehand. This proofs that music is able to become a media for interaction without any verbal expression.

 

Through this workshop, Monica wanted to show what music can do, and that music can also become an effective therapy medium for people with special needs.

“This is what we learn in UPH. In Indonesia, UPH is the only undergraduate university that has Music Therapy as its concentration. In Music Therapy UPH, we learn everything comprehensively; we don’t just learn about music, but we also learn about psychology, medical and many other subjects that might support the learning process for this particular concentration,” Monica explained. 

 

According to Monica, Indonesia is still far behind other countries in a matter of music therapy. But now, Monica feels deeply grateful that music therapy has been developing ever since. As a contribution, there are lots of UPH students who practice music therapy at the hospital, at schools, clinics, as well as other institutions.

 

 

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Kezia 
 

One of UPH Music Therapy students, Kezia, who will soon be continuing her Master Degree in Canada, also shared her experience. Kezia admitted that she has ever practiced therapy at orphanages, nursing homes, and mental hospitals, back when she was doing her thesis.

“In becoming a therapist, we have to be patient, we need empathy, social abilities, the ability to interact with different kinds of people, and surely, we need musical abilities,” Kezia added. 

 

 

With this opportunity, Monica hopes that more people, including all the people who were present during UPH Public Exposure, are able to understand the great role of music and what music can do in our life. She also hopes that people can understand music more than just an entertainment, but also an influential aspect that can change human’s mind and body. (mt) 

 
 
 
UPH Media Relations